The new medium of exchange

The new medium of exchange

Cryptocurrencies and blockchain assets are the newest and potentially most promising new asset class.

By JONATHAN MISOI

The Rotary Club of Eldoret, where I am a member, played host to a talk titled “Cryptocurrencies: Myths, Facts, Figures and Future”. As I took to the stage to speak, I could see the faces of attendees, fully packed in our small Rotary meeting place, pregnant with expectation and questions of what Cryptocurrencies hold for them and the future.

I shot the first question: “By show of hands, how many have heard about Bitcoins?”Many hands rose.

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The future of work is here

The future of work is here

The ‘workforce’ of the future will include Artificial Intelligence, freelancers and even crowd-sourcing. Artifical Intelligence will do most of the ‘heavy-lifting’ or repetitive tasks, enabling human employees to operate more productively. 

By FRANCOIS VAN DYK

“Education is the passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to those who prepare for it today.” – Malcolm X

I have always been a bit of a science-fiction fan. Certainly not one of those that get dressed up for comic conventions like The Big Bang Theory’s nerdy scientists Leonard, Sheldon, Wolowitz and Raj but a sci-fi fan nonetheless.

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Right environment and staff key to startup success

Right environment and staff key to startup success

The primary purpose of enterprise management is to select the best people and empower them to accomplish productive work toward the organisation’s objectives.

By MURORI KIUNGA

When I quit employment over 10 years ago to start my own business, one seasoned managing director of a local company told me one thing that to date has informed most of my business decision, especially on human resources.

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The culture of agility and staying ahead

The culture of agility and staying ahead

Companies that empower their workforce – by helping them plan for the unknown, mitigate risk and thrive at work – will be more successful in building a responsive and successful organisation.

By STACY BRONSTEIN

As competition for talent continues to rise and business models are disrupted by technology and socio-demographic shifts, organisations are still taking an evolutionary approach to their talent strategies in the face of revolutionary changes. According to Mercer’s 2017 Global Talent Trends Study, nearly all organisations globally (93 per cent) report they are planning to redesign their structure in the next two years.

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Are you strong enough to HIRE WOMEN?

Are you strong enough to HIRE WOMEN?

By JOYCE KADUKI

Most companies, professions, government institutions, and non-professional bodies such as political parties and churches have been historically dominated by men. Even now, there are more men than women at the workplace.

According to the International Labour Office’s publication Women at Work: Trends 2016, women’s labour force participation in 2015 was estimated at 49.6 per cent. The finding that there are fewer female employees than male is consistent with the results of another study – Women in the Workplace 2016 – which was conducted by McKinsey and LeanIn.org among over 130 companies and more than 34,000 men and women. This second study established that women remain underrepresented at every level in the corporate pipeline.

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The dilemma of managing four generations in the workplace

The dilemma of managing four generations in the workplace

By TABITHA AREBA

For productivity to be alive and well in any organisation, there are some key factors that employers need to focus on.

There is a new problem at the workplace and it has nothing to do with salary increment, flexible working hours or downsizing. For the first time in the corporate world, four generations are working together and they seem to have fundamental differences in the way they look at things. We have the Baby Boomers, Generation X, Generation Y and Generation Z. With this reality, there is a huge dilemma on how businesses can ensure optimal productivity. The 2016 KIM Corporate Breakfast brought together HR experts to look into this dilemma and how to get it right. In Kenya for example, 75 per cent of the population is below the age of 35 years, meaning that policies and processes in most organisations suit only 25 per cent of the population.

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Success is not by chance

Success is not by chance

By David Muturi

I love plans, and firmly believe that regardless of what you choose to do in life, the starting point is managing yourself. To do this effectively, you need a personal plan. Such a plan hinges on the basics of what you seek in life. Once you know what you want, you must define the limits that you would like to stretch yourself to in order to realize your dreams.

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Farming for the future

Farming for the future

For there to be advancement in farming, African farmers will have to embrace technology which will improve efficiencies.

By FRANCOIS VAN DYK

In a world obsessed with anything from the latest gossip on the Kardashians right through to Pokemon Go, it is very easy to forget the basics of human needs. Bread, vegetables, meat, sugar, milk, in fact whatever suits our taste, is something we get from the corner shop. We complain when prices rise, the kids refuse to eat their broccoli, we enjoy a nice steak now and again but it has become something we take for granted.

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Interest rate capping: Will it work in Kenya?

Interest rate capping: Will it work in Kenya?

Once the law comes into force, interest rates will drop to a maximum of 14.5 per cent given the CBR’s current standing at 10.5 per cent.

By MICHAEL WACHIRA

Kenya has 42 commercial banks, but the six largest ones popularly known as Tier One control 52.4 per cent of the entire industry. This leads to only a few banks controlling the market, just like any other economy across the globe. Banks act as middlemen through whom we deposit monies and get advances and loans. They make money from the differences between the rate which they pay the depositors and the one they charge the borrower. This difference is called the interest rate spread.

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The missing link to delighting your customers

The missing link to delighting your customers

VoC program can build closer connections with customers by giving them what they need, how they need it.

By ANGELA RARIEYA

 Be bold! Be brave! Be heard in the boardroom this year! Might a Voice of the Customer (VoC) program be the missing link to making delightful experiences for your customers a reality in your business?

Simply put, VoC refers to feedback customers give a business with regard to their experiences with the company’s products and/or services. This becomes invaluable data for businesses in helping them bridge the gap between customer expectations and actual experiences with their brands.

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