New trends in sports marketing

New trends in sports marketing

 Sports marketers need skills for integrating different elements of social media such as tweets, blogs, wall posts, and chats.
 “Broadcast messages are as effective as direct messages when marketing fun products but not when marketing useful products,” Christian Shulze and colleagues.
By JOHN OREDO
Sam Fullerton and Russel Merz in a paper titled “The Four Domains of Sports Marketing” published in the journal “Sports Marketing Quarterly” trace the genesis of the term “sports marketing” to a story in the 1978 issue of the magazine ‘Advertising Age”. In that magazine, sports marketing is described activities of consumers and industrial products and service marketers who are increasingly using sports as a promotional vehicle. Sports marketing therefore, is the application of marketing principles in an effort to satisfy the needs of sports consumers and customers. It is a double pronged concept that means both marketing of sports and marketing through sports. Marketing of sports involves promoting sports products and services to a targeted set of consumers, while marketing through sports implies marketing an array of non-sports products to market segments that have a personal investment in sports entities such as athletes, events and teams.
There are three guiding principles to sports marketing. The first is to understand the sports marketing focus in terms of marketing of sports and marketing through sports. The second principle is about determining the nature of the product or service being marketed – are they sports or non-sports products and services. Lastly, determining the level of integration of sports within the marketing strategy. All these principles need to inform any sports marketing strategy, whether traditional or digital. In sports marketing today, it is important to note that the digital natives – that generation of citizens that have grown up taking for granted instant access to digital information – is entering the workplace and would be the greatest consumers of sports products and services. This generation, also known as the netizens, forms the mass market of tomorrow. The changes in consumer behaviour as epitomized by the netizens require marketers to rethink their marketing strategies in the digital domain. Digital marketing is poised to overtake traditional media given that they are “lean forward” as they require greater degree of interactivity compared to traditional media, which involves little interactivity and are therefore said to be “lean back.”

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Uganda offers refugees a home away from home

Uganda offers refugees a home away from home

 During the just concluded 71st Session of the UN General Assembly (UNGA 71) which was in September 2016 at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, 193 governments committed to help many more refugees to reunite. In this article, we look at what Uganda has done in empowering refugees to become gainfully employed, self-sufficient, and to live in dignity.
“It is my view that an economically empowered refugee is beneficial to the national economy,” said Marcel Tibaleka, Uganda’s Ambassador to Germany and The Vatican.

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A little courtesy goes a long way

A little courtesy goes a long way

 Human beings have an innate desire to be recognized, valued and appreciated for their worth and contribution.
 ‘A good leader, they say, is someone who can step on your toes without messing up your shine.’
By Muindi Kimanzi
The famous Dale Carnegie’s bestselling book, ‘How to Win Friends and Influence People’ alludes to different aspects of human relations in life and at the workplace. It emphasises goodness, courtesy and showing respectful behavior while relating with people. Such conduct bears tangible results and people tend to gravitate towards individuals that demonstrate these virtues. The book is an awesome read, full of aged wisdom and unconventional practices that signify the essence of courtesy at the workplace.
Generally, people wish to be cared for. Author John Maxwell observes that, “people don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.” Human beings have an innate desire to be recognised, valued and appreciated for their worth and contribution. Statistics show that organisations that practice employee recognition and reward mechanisms have a low turnover of staff members compared to ones that don’t. “Organisations with recognition programmes which are highly effective at enabling employee engagement had 31 per cent lower voluntary turnover than organisations with ineffective recognition programs,” according to a 2012 report titled The State of Employee Recognition by Deloitte.
The four magic phrases
It is upon any company’s management and human resource department to institute such mechanisms as they end up benefiting staff as well as the organisation’s wellbeing. Since relating with staff is a day-to-day business practice, remember to use the four magic phrases of courteous expressions. These include; thank you, please, excuse me and sorry. It is much better when you can demonstrate the same with actions.
Carnegie points out in his book an exceptional figure, former US president, Harry S. Truman whose life was characterised by good interpersonal skills while relating with his staff members. For example, when the White House chef made him a cake for his birthday, he ate it and walked into the kitchen to say ‘thank you’ to the chef. This was such a unique move as the chef had served in the White House under many presidents but rarely received such appreciation.
On a different day while having dinner at the White House, Truman noticed that the pianist was having a slight challenge playing through the cords while pausing to flip the book in order to get to the next page and continue playing. Truman, who was also the host of the dinner walked up to the pianist and helped flip through the pages until the pianist was done playing. Such acts cemented his successful presidency and legacy.

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The unexploited frontier of Kenya’s rich sports heritage

The unexploited frontier of Kenya’s rich sports heritage

 Kenya has not fully exploited its full potential in sports marketing. There is enormous opportunity for brands to market itself through sporting activities.
QUOTE: “They (major brands) could not be investing in sports marketing if there is no money to be made. This is simply big business that we have not understood locally,” Prof. Bitange Ndemo.
By COSMAS MOTANGI
Harambee Stars, Kenya’s national football team, was preparing to face Togo’s national football team, Les Eperviers (The Sparrow Hawks), in the Orange Africa Cup of Nations qualifier in Nairobi in early 2012.
The spirit was high among the Harambee Stars players who were assured of their bonuses and other incentives following the team’s signing of a three-year KSh 10 million sponsorship deal with East African Breweries Limited (EABL).
Yet, all was not well between the Stars and EABL, the team’s sponsor and the country’s largest brewer. This is because three key players – then France-based striker Dennis Oliech, his then Italy-based counterpart, MacDonald Mariga, and Kenya Premier League striker Bob Mugalia -were threatening to sue the brewer for using their images on a billboard without their consent.
The company, however, disputed their account saying it had a contract with the national team containing clauses that allowed it, as a sponsor, to use images of the team’s players in promotions. The matter was, however, later amicably resolved.
Sports marketing
Welcome to the world of sports marketing, which Dr. Russell Hoye, an associate professor in the School of Sport, Tourism and Hospitality Management, La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia, says is the application of marketing concepts to sports products and services, and the marketing of non-sport products through an association to sport.
Prof. Hoye says it has two key features, first, the application of general marketing practices to sport-related products and services, and secondly, the marketing of other consumer and industrial products or services through sports.
“Like any form of marketing, sport marketing seeks to fulfil the needs and wants of consumers. It achieves this by providing sport services and sport-related products to consumers,” he says.
It is not surprising the sports personalities, including Kenyans, have been bagging lucrative sponsorship deals with different companies.
Prof. Bitange Ndemo, an associate professor at the University of Nairobi’s School of Business, says that from the advertising point of view, there is no better way of marketing sports products other than leveraging on the image of the athletes who are sometimes icons across the world.
“They (major brands) could not be investing in sports marketing if there is no money to be made. This is simply big business that we have not understood locally,” says Prof. Ndemo.
Brand ambassadors
It is a view shared by Dr. X.N. Iraki, a senior lecturer, University of Nairobi, who says major brands sponsor prominent sports personalities because it is very profitable. “They use sportsmen and women because they are well known, hence attract customers. Think of how many golf enthusiasts would want to be associated with any product being marketed by Tiger Woods or in tennis by the Serena sisters,” he says.
This holds true in Kenya where, for instance, Paul Tergat, Kenya’s former world marathon record holder, stared in the Johnnie Walker whisky’s global ‘Walk With Giants’ campaign.
Also, former Olympic and world 3000m Steeplechase champion, Ezekiel Kemboi, has been the Tusker ambassador while the world champion, the African and Commonwealth record javelin holder, Julius Yego, is the Telkom Orange internet ambassador.
According to the second edition of PwC outlook for the global sports market, while the commercial dynamics of sport and entertainment have always overlapped, the two are now closer than ever before.
“In many cases, sporting entertainment and commercial success are now seen as two sides of the same coin,” says the PWC report titled ‘Changing the game: Outlook for the global sports market to 2015.’
The report’s findings show that sports’ marketing is now big business. “We project that global revenues from sports sponsorships will increase from USD35 billion (KSh 3.5 trillion) in 2010 to USD45.3 billion (KSh 4.53 trillion) in 2015, a 5.3 per cent compound annual increase,” it notes.
Enormous opportunities
Industry watchers, however, note that Kenya has not fully exploited its full potential in sports marketing. Dr Iraki attributes this to a presence of very few big brands to effectively compete to sponsor the athletes and other sports personalities. “We have also do not understand the potential (of sports marketing). To exploit this potential, we must invest in sportsmen who can make global marks in the league of golf great Tiger Woods and ride on them,” says Dr. Iraki.
Prof. Ndemo concurs that there is an enormous opportunity for Kenya to market herself through her sportsmen and women. “We have not, however, fully exploited that because we always look to the government for any form of funding. We need to change that and start using corporates to sponsor our sports activities and personalities.”
Prof. Ndemo, the former permanent secretary in the Ministry of Information and Communication, adds that Kenyan firms like East Africa’s most profitable company mobile phone service provider, Safaricom, and banks like KCB and Equity should be the official sponsors of the Kenyan team to Olympics. “This would lessen corruption as we can attest from the last Olympics.”
Indeed Kenya firms are slowly warming up to sports sponsorship with betting firm, SportPesa, sponsoring the English Premier League (EPL) football club, Hull City, and Kenya Premier League (KPL) football clubs AFC Leopards and Gor Mahia.
Safaricom is sponsoring a number of athletics activities and rugby, Kenya Airways sponsoring the Kenya’s Safari 7s team while EABL has sponsored KPL club, Tusker, Mathare United is sponsored by Britam and Thika United by Brookside Dairy.
Email: motangic@gmail.com

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